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Equivalents in other units


How much is 2 terabytes?

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It's about half as much as Watson.
In other words, the amount of Watson is 2 times 2 terabytes.
(data store only)
Watson, the IBM supercomputer famous for competing against humans on the televised trivia game show Jeopardy!, utilizes 4 terabytes of variously-structured data to formulate answers. While "thinking", Watson processes about 0.49 terabytes of data per second.
It's about three-tenths as much as a Gap, Inc. Customer Database.
In other words, the amount of a Gap, Inc. Customer Database is 3 times 2 terabytes.
(a.k.a. The GAP Companies, a.k.a. Gap) (2012 figures)
The GAP Inc., the corporate parent of GAP store, Old Navy, and Banana Republic, has accumulated over 7 terabytes of data on almost a billion customers. The GAP, Inc remains the largest apparel retailer in the United States and was the largest in the world from the mid-1990s until about 2008.
It's about thirteen times as much as an iPod.
In other words, 2 terabytes is 12.8 times the amount of an iPod, and the amount of an iPod is 0.0781 times that amount.
(a.k.a. Apple iPod) (2010 figures; for iPod classic, sixth generation)
A sixth-generation, iPod classic MP3 player offers a storage capacity of 0.156 terabytes. Data is stored in the unit's hard drive, a 5,400 RPM SATA drive, which measures about 30 sq. cm (5 sq. in)
It's about one-twentieth as much as The Amazon.com's databases.
In other words, 2 terabytes is 0.0472641 times the amount of The Amazon.com's databases, and the amount of The Amazon.com's databases is 21.1577 times that amount.
(largest databases only; 2005 figures)
Amazon.com maintains information on the millions of items sold on it's e-Commerce website and the websites of its affiliate companies, as well as information on customer orders and browsing history, and excerpts from nearly a quarter-billion books in databases totaling an estimated 43.331 terabytes (tB) of data. Amazon.com receives over 615 million visits to its US website each year.
It's about one-thirty-fifth as much as The Google Earth database.
In other words, the amount of The Google Earth database is 35.2 times 2 terabytes.
(2006 figures) (raw imagery and indexes storage)
As of 2006, Google was storing 70.5 terabytes (tB) of raw image and index data for its satellite photo and virtual globe application, Google Earth. The application offers high resolution satellite imagery of 60% of the populated areas of the world, according to 2010 estimates.
It's about forty times as much as Wikipedia.
In other words, the amount of Wikipedia is 0.026 times 2 terabytes.
(2009 figures) (all languages)
As of 2009, Wikipedia held 0.052 terabytes of publicly written and edited encyclopedia articles on 14.5 million subjects as well as associated commentary and discussion. Wikipedia is among the ten most popular websites on the Internet and the only non-profit entity in that group.
It's about 40 times as much as a Blu-ray Disc.
In other words, 2 terabytes is 41 times the amount of a Blu-ray Disc, and the amount of a Blu-ray Disc is 0.024 times that amount.
(a.k.a. BD) (dual-layer; Blu-ray disc)
A typical Blu-ray disc will hold 0.049 terabytes of data. The increase in capacity versus a standard DVD is possible because of the smaller wavelength of blue light — 405 nanometers instead of 650 nanometers for the red laser light used in a DVD.