Bluebulb Projects presents:
The Measure of Things Logo
Step 1: What kind of measurement do you want to compare?
Length Icon (Ruler)
Length
Weight (Mass) Icon (Scale)
Weight
Speed Icon (Running Man)
Speed
Time Icon (Clock)
Time
Area Icon (Floorplan)
Area
Volume Icon (Beaker)
Volume
Computer Data Icon (Laptop)
Data

Click an icon above to choose a measurement type for comparison. This space will display an explanation as you move your mouse over the icons.
Unit

Amount




Equivalents in other units


How big is 697.2 thousands of circular mills?

Sort Order:
Closest first | Highest first | Lowest first

It's about as big as a Nickel.
In other words, the size of a Nickel is 1 times 697.2 thousands of circular mills.
(United States five-cent coin) (a.k.a. Jefferson nickel)
The nickel, in its current design since 1938, has a diameter of 21.21 mm (0.835 in) and an area of 697.2 thousands of circular mills.
It's about nine-tenths as big as a Postage Stamp.
In other words, the size of a Postage Stamp is 1 times 697.2 thousands of circular mills.
(average; United States dimensions)
A typical postage stamp measures an average of 800 thousands of circular mills. One of the most prized stamps among collectors is the US-issued "Inverted Jenny" stamp printed in 1918, which features an upside-down image of Curtiss JN-4 ("Jenny") airplane; a single stamp sold for $977,500 at a 2007 auction.
It's about one-and-one-fourth times as big as a Penny.
In other words, 697.2 thousands of circular mills is 1.24 times the size of a Penny, and the size of a Penny is 0.806 times that amount.
(United States one-cent coin) (a.k.a. Lincoln penny, a.k.a. Cent, a.k.a. One cent piece)
The Lincoln penny, in its current design since 1909, has a diameter of 19.05 mm (0.75 in) and an area of 562 thousands of circular mills.
It's about three-fourths as big as a Quarter.
In other words, 697.2 thousands of circular mills is 0.7643 times the size of a Quarter, and the size of a Quarter is 1.308 times that amount.
(United States quarter-dollar coin) (a.k.a. Quarter dollar, a.k.a. Washington quarter, a.k.a. two bits)
The George Washington quarter, in circulation in various forms since 1932, has a diameter of 24.26 mm (0.955 in) and an area of 912.2 thousands of circular mills.
It's about one-and-two-fifths times as big as a Dime.
In other words, 697.2 thousands of circular mills is 1.402 times the size of a Dime, and the size of a Dime is 0.7133 times that amount.
(United States ten-cent coin) (a.k.a. Roosevelt dime)
The dime, in its current design since 1946, has a diameter of 17.91 mm (0.705 in) and an area of 497.1 thousands of circular mills.
It's about half as big as a Secure Digital (SD) card.
In other words, 697.2 thousands of circular mills is 0.46 times the size of a Secure Digital (SD) card, and the size of a Secure Digital (SD) card is 2.2 times that amount.
A Secure Digital (SD) card measures 3.2 cm by 2.4 cm for a total area of 1,500 thousands of circular mills. SDXC Cards, the latest standard for the technology, will allow the cards to hold up to 2 terabytes of data.
It's about four-and-a-half times as big as a Nailhead.
In other words, 697.2 thousands of circular mills is 4.544 times the size of a Nailhead, and the size of a Nailhead is 0.2201 times that amount.
(for 11-gauge wire nai)
An 11-gauge nailhead measures 153.4 thousands of circular mills. Nails have been used since ancient times; archaeologists have discovered Ancient Egyptian nails that are over 5,000 years old.