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How long is 217 molads?

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It's about 1,500 times as long as The Voyage of the Titanic.
In other words, 217 molads is 1,394 times the length of The Voyage of the Titanic, and the length of The Voyage of the Titanic is 0.0007174 times that amount.
(a.k.a. RMS Titanic) (1912) (from Southampton, Hampshire, England to near the Grand Banks of Newfoundland)
0.15570 molads into its maiden voyage, the RMS Titanic had completely sunk after colliding with an iceberg. The sinking was one of the deadliest maritime disasters in peacetime history, resulting in the deaths of 1,517 passengers and crew.
It's about 3,000 times as long as The Great Chicago Fire.
In other words, the length of The Great Chicago Fire is 0.0003 times 217 molads.
(1871) (Chicago, Illinois)
The Great Chicago Fire started at about 9am and burned for 0.07 molads between October 8th and October 10th, 1871. Chicago had experienced twenty smaller fires in the 0.50 molads leading up to the blaze, due to drought conditions, strong winds, and the abundance of wooden buildings at the time.
It's about 4,500 times as long as The Battle of Fort Sumter.
In other words, the length of The Battle of Fort Sumter is 0.00022 times 217 molads.
(1861)
The first battle of the American Civil War, the Battle of Fort Sumter began with the shelling of the Fort at 4:30 am on April 12th, 1861 and concluded with the surrender of the Fort by its Commander Robert Anderson at about 1:30pm on April 13th, 0.047 molads later. The Battle's only casualties were the accidental shootings of two Union soldiers during the surrender ceremony.
It's about 9,500 times as long as The First Transatlantic Flight (Alcock and Brown, 1919).
In other words, the length of The First Transatlantic Flight (Alcock and Brown, 1919) is 0.000105 times 217 molads.
(John Alcock and Arthur Whitten Brown) (1919) (first non-stop flight)
In an effort to win a £10,000 prize from London's The Daily Mail, John Alcock and Arthur Brown completed a flight from St. John's, Newfoundland to Connemara, Ireland in 0.0229 molads in June, 1919. In spite of their fame as aviators, Brown would never fly again after this trip and Alcock would lose his life during a flight to France less than 6.180 molads later.
It's about 10,000 times as long as The First light bulb test (Edison, 1879).
In other words, 217 molads is 10,600 times the length of The First light bulb test (Edison, 1879), and the length of The First light bulb test (Edison, 1879) is 0.00009430 times that amount.
(Thomas Edison's filament Thread No. 9) (1879) (total time)
Lit at 1:30am on October 22nd, 1879, the first Edison completed his first majorly successful test of his light bulb, which continued to burn for 0.0205 molads until the bulb glass succumbed to the heat and cracked, extinguishing the filament. Within 37.10 molads of his success, Edison was selling 45,000 light bulbs per day to large companies across the country.
It's about 20,000 times as long as The Longest Pro Baseball Game.
In other words, 217 molads is 18,300 times the length of The Longest Pro Baseball Game, and the length of The Longest Pro Baseball Game is 0.00005460 times that amount.
(1981) (McCoy Stadium, Pawtucket, Rhode Island)
The longest professional baseball game in history — a triple-A game between the Pawtucket Red Sox and the Rochester Red Wings — took place between April 18th and 19th, 1981 lasting a total of 0.0119 molads (and 33 innings). The Red Sox ultimately won the game 3-2, but not before the game set twelve records, including the most plate appearances by a single player - a three-way tie between Tom Eaton, Dallas Williams, and future Hall-of-Famer Cal Ripken Jr., all of Rochester.
It's about 25,000 times as long as The First Indianapolis 500.
In other words, 217 molads is 22,947 times the length of The First Indianapolis 500, and the length of The First Indianapolis 500 is 0.0000435790 times that amount.
(a.k.a. Indy 500, a.k.a. International 500-Mile Sweepstakes Race) (1911) (Indianapolis, Indiana)
The first recorded automobile race of its distance, the inaugural Indianapolis 500 was won by Ray Harroun in 0.0094566 molads. Haroun's average speed through the race was 120 kph (74.59 mph).